NYC Gifted and Talented Program and Testing


Teaching risk taking part of school success at NEST
October 4, 2017, 5:49 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program | Tags: ,

The principal at NEST encourages students to take risks of failure

The trend continues throughout the city and the rest of the US to encourage kids not only to take risks but also encourage kids in the experience of failure. It seems the pendulum has swung swiftly into the other direction from everyone gets a trophy for just showing up to encouragement of risk taking which in turn leads to failure. NEST is the latest example of incorporating this type of teaching throughout the school to it’s 1,700+ student population. Here are a few of things that have been introduced at NEST+M to create a culture of perseverance of fail and try again and students seem to be responding.

  • The library is equipped with 3-D printers and laptops to transform the way students work and interact within a library setting.
  •  Students have their own publication using a popular software product called InDesign. The students select all the writing passages and the artwork that are within the magazine.
  • Instead of traditional methods of teaching to younger grades, the school utilizes student’s talents to give talks and presentation on a variety of topics.
  • In the middle school program the students are taught robotics and this teaches both computer programming and math skills with this specific program.

Most schools today are still slow to adapt to these additional skills that are impertative for all students to learn. Many parents are familiar with teaching a child “grit” which helps a child with perseverance and passion for the long-term and not short-term satisfaction. These are the types of things that seem to be finally entering our schools and helping kids to feel less entitled than their previous not-so-grateful millennials.  Here are a few tips that parents can help their child at home to develop grit:

  • Instead of praising your child that he or she is “smart”, rather focus on the child’s hard work or effort to finish or complete a task (i.e. homework, reading a book, working on a challenging project, etc.)
  • Most parents don’t want their child to experience any frustration. Believe it or not, frustration your child experiences leads to a sense of achievement that a child needs to successfully accomplish a task. None of like to wait but having your child experience frustration is a pathway to long term success.
  • When your child fails congratulate him or her! Ask him or her how they feel about the failure and what might they change next time to make sure they aren’t going to fail again. It’s a good lesson for parents to teach although it’s difficult for some parents to have this conversation with their child.


NYC Gifted and Talented Testing Overview

NYC Gifted and Talented Testing

Here’s a good overview of the NYC gifted and talented program as of early 2017. If you are reading this, then you are a parent or a grandparent in NYC who is trying to find the best possible school for your little one.  There are so many options in New York – private schools, gifted and talented programs, general education – it can sometimes feel overwhelming, especially if your child is just 4-years-old!

Citywide Gifted and Talented Programs

Children will take the Verbal Portion only of the Otis Lennon School Ability Test® (OLSAT® test), which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score (Following Directions, Aural Reasoning, Arithmetic Reasoning for Levels A, B, C or K – 2nd grade), and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test® (NNAT®2 test), a non-verbal test, which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score. The question to your right is a practice question for the Pattern Completion subtest for the NNAT2 test.

 

OLSAT Levels

Grade

 Level A  Pre-K to Kindergarten
 Level B  First Grade
 Level C  Second Grade

Your child will be given a nationally normed percentile rank for the OLSAT test and a percentile rank for the NNAT2 test.  Then, these two scores will be combined into a single percentile score that will be normed against other NYC students.   A child must score at the 97th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.  In the last few years (due to space limitations), only children who score in the 99th percentile have gotten into these programs.  The only exception to this is siblings of current students who are admitted with 97th percentile or above.

District Gifted and Talented Programs

Children will take the Verbal Portion only of the Otis Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT test), which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score (Following Directions, Aural Reasoning, Arithmetic Reasoning for Levels A, B, C or K – 2nd grade), and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test® (NNAT®2 test), a non-verbal test, which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score – a child must score at the 90th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.

Your child will be given a nationally normed percentile rank for the OLSAT test and a percentile rank score for the NNAT2 test.  Then, these two scores will be combined into a single percentile score that will be normed against other NYC students.   A child must score at the 90th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.

For the Otis Lennon School Ability Test® (OLSAT® test), there are 3 types of questions:

 

 Types of Questions

Description of type of OLSAT verbal questions

Arithmetic Reasoning

The child must listen carefully to math word problems that use basic mathematical concepts such as same, different, fewer, more, etc., along with simple addition, subtraction, fractions (half, quarter), etc.

Following Directions

Here the child must listen carefully to verbal questions describing similarities and differences, positional and rank comparisons (above, below, between, next to, bigger, smaller, etc.), or descriptions and choose visual images that fit the description.

 Aural Reasoning

Again, the child must listen carefully to verbal descriptions of scenarios, similarities and differences, prepositions, and situations that use vocabulary or ideas that make the child think in order to choose the visual image that fits the description.