NYC Gifted and Talented Program and Testing


NYC Gifted and Talented Test Results

The time has arrived for OLSAT and NNAT-2 test results to be released!

Earlier this week parents across all five boroughs were disappointed or elated depending on the scores they received for their talented tot who took the NYC G&T test in January 2018.  Parents across Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan, Bronx and Staten Island have tons of questions about the city wide programs and district wide programs. Here are questions that parents are asking themselves and others after receiving the test scores:

  • My son scored a 98th percentile on the NYC gifted and talented tests. Do you provide advice on the quality of specific G&T school programs?
  • My child scored 99th percentile, which gives him a chance for lottery at any of the five city-wide G&T schools. I think the fact that my child has an older sibling in one of the five city-wide G&T school almost guarantees him a spot at that school. However, if I rank other city-wide G&T schools (without sibling priority) before this city-wide G&T (with sibling priority), will that hurt his chance of getting into the G&T with sibling priority (if he didn’t get a spot in other city-wide G&T)? In other words, do I have to rank the city-wide G&T first to be sure that he will at least get into one of the city-wide? (1 of 2)
  • Will you provide a little bit more information on the five city-wide in terms of their respective strength, focus, advantages, etc.? ( 2 of 2)
  • My son scored a 98th percentile and has no siblings so will not get into citywide gifted program. Can he go to a district G&T not in our district?
  • How do placements for the District G&T programs work? Do the kids who score 97 and above have priority over those who score in the 90th-96th percentile?
  • My daughter scored in the 95th percentile. Any sense of her chances of getting a District placement?
  • Would a sibling of a current District G&T program who scored less than my daughter have higher priority than my daughter for such program?
  • What are the chances of a child with a score of 97 getting into a citywide program?
  • I would like to know what happens if you have accepted a placement in your district G&T school and then move during the summer months. Are you then able to get a seat in September at your new local district G&T school or is it just tough luck from that point on?
  • What should be the next step? My child got a 95th percentile
    •  Can I apply to any school, in any district with a 99, or just schools in my district and schools designated as “citywide” schools?
    • Does the overall score matter for applications or do they look at how many correct out of tested questions child got correct? For example, do they look at 99 percentile or 36 out of 40 correct?
  • How do we tour the schools if the deadline for choosing top choices is so near?
  • Question: if my child qualified for citywide can he apply to any district wide g&t or is he limited to a g&t in his district?
  • We are in district 2, and wanted some feedback on schools in district 2 (or even other districts) and chances of him getting offer being at 98th percentile. He doesn’t have sibling, and being at 98 we feel getting into 1st grade is bit difficult given than schools offer very few seats for new 1st graders.
  • I’m interested in the details of the lottery process. Is it done at each school? If so, since each applicant can select multiple schools and there’s an order which shows preference, how is that handled.
    • Based on this year’s numbers, would a 97 percentile child without sibling priority have any chance at all for a citywide G&T program?
    • Would a 97 percentile child without sibling priority have any chance at all for a district gifted program without district priority (program not within the district where the child resides)?

Here’s a good article that answers many of the questions above and more!



Preparing for the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests
February 15, 2018, 3:26 pm
Filed under: tests | Tags: , ,

Taking any test can be tough, especially if you’re 4 years old

First, the bad news. Preparing a young child for the NYC Gifted and Talented Test takes works, lots of work! And if you want your child to get admitted to a citywide or district gifted program, your child must receive a qualifying score. There are many pitfalls and obstacles that can stand in the way of your child getting a top score on the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests:

  • Being unfamiliar with the types of questions on the test
  • Test anxiety and not being able sit still for an hour with a stranger
  • Leaving preparing your child for the test to the last minute
  • Not preparing at all
  • Not knowing basic test taking skills like process of elimination and guessing

One of things most parents experience is test anxiety even though they aren’t the ones taking the test! You want to make sure you don’t transfer your anxiety onto your child. You want to make sure your child is prepared and that will help eliminate the anxiety for both you and your child.

Here are a few tips to help eliminate test anxiety:

  • Teach your child to breathe slowly during test and stretch if they need to.
  • Tell your child it’s ok to ask the test proctor (teacher) to take a break to use the restroom during the test.
  • Make sure you visit the testing facility PRIOR to test day so your child is familiar with the school and you can tell your child you’ll be returning to speak to a teacher “who wants to know everything a 4 year old knows!”

Once you’re in the final stretch with test day is within 30 days make sure you make a 30-day plan to really get your child prepared for the test.

  • Do a mock exam from sites like TestingMom.com where you can get a good gauge of where your child is at in knowing the concepts on the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests
  • Do not change your child’s schedule and make sure you keep a solid routine with diet, bedtime and anything to keep the schedule normal. Now is not the time to go on vacation, change your child’s diet (unless it’s unhealthy) or change bedtime or wake time in the morning.


Top 10 gifted and talented programs in NYC
December 20, 2017, 4:47 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program | Tags:

Subjective review of the top 10 gifted and talented programs in NYC

According to Insider Monkey, there’s an actual pecking order for NYC gifted and talented schools. This includes elementary through high school programs.  They did an analysis based upon information they found on DNA Info (now out of business), a company that preys off the fears of parents of kids taking the gifted and talented test (Test Prep Online) and Google Reviews (given by named and unnamed/anonymous sources). With that being said, please take this “top 10” list with a grain of salt and do your own primary and secondary research when selecting a gifted program for your talented tot!

 

  1. PS 10 – Magnet School Of Math Science & Design Tech Google rating: 4.9 out of 5; 511 7th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215
  2. P.S. 77 Lower Lab School, Google rating: 4.8 out of 5;  1700 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10128
  3. Staten Island Technical High School Google rating: 4.6 out of 5; 485  Clawson St, Staten Island, NY 10306
  4. The Anderson School  Google rating: 4.6 out of 5; 100 W 77th St, New York, NY 10024
  5. Brooklyn School of Inquiry, Google rating: 4.4 out of 5; 50 Avenue P, Brooklyn, NY 11204
  6. NEST+m, Google rating: 4.3 out of 5; 111 Columbia St, New York, NY 10002
  7.  Stuyvesant High School, Google rating: 4.3 out of 5;  345 Chambers St, New York, NY 10282
  8. TAG Young Scholars School, Google rating: 4.2 out of 5; 240 E 109th St, New York, NY 10029
  9. The 30th Avenue School, Google rating: 4.2 out of 5;  28-37 29th St, Astoria, NY 11102
  10. Mark Twain Intermediate School 239, Google rating: 3.9 out of 5; 2401 Neptune Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11224


NYC Gifted and Talented Information Sessions
September 27, 2017, 12:52 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program | Tags: ,

All districts to host NYC G&T Info. Sessions

You can get to know all about the NYC Gifted and Talented program during the upcoming information sessions in October through November. They can tell you all about the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests along with any other questions you may have about admission requirements for the G&T program for New York City.

Here are some tips and tricks about the NYC Gifted and Talented Program:

  1. There are two types of G&T programs, District and Citywide. True
  2. Students must take the G&T Test to participate in G&T. True
  3. Students must score a 90 or higher on the G&T test to get a G&T application. True
  4. There is no guarantee that a student will get a gifted and talented offer letter, regardless of their OLSAT and NNAT-2 scores. True
  5. The gifted programs in NYC give admission priority with siblings currently enrolled in those programs.  True

As with last year, these sessions are now held at the district level and parents can do one-stop shopping to learn all about the G&T program, universal pre-K and kindergarten admission requirements.

If you can make one the sessions below the DOE does request you RSVP here.

* Middle school admissions will be discussed

DISTRICT LOCATION DATE & TIME

 District 1

 P.S. 15 Roberto Clemente
333 East 4th Street
Manhattan, NY 10009
 Tuesday, November 14, 2017
5:30–7:30pm

 District 2

 M.S. 260 Clinton School Writers Artists
10 East 15th Street
Manhattan, NY 10003
 Wednesday, October 25, 2017
6–8pm

 District 3

 Joan of Arc building
(P.S. 333 Manhattan School for Children)
154 West 93rd Street
Manhattan, NY 10025
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5:30–7:30pm

 District 4*

 The Tito Puente Complex
240 East 109th Street
Manhattan, NY 10029
 Tuesday, October 3, 2017
5:30–7:30pm

 District 5*

 P.S. 092 Mary McLeod Bethune
222 West 134th Street
Manhattan, NY 10030
 Wednesday, October 11, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 6*  J.H.S. 143 Eleanor Roosevelt
511 West 182nd Street
Manhattan, NY 10033
 Tuesday, October 17, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 7*  P.S. 065 Mother Hale Academy
677 East 141st Street
Bronx, NY 10454
 Thursday, October 19, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 8  P.S. 119
1075 Pugsley Avenue
Bronx, NY 10472
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 9*  P.S./I.S. 218 Rafael Hernandez Dual   Language Magnet School
1220 Gerard Avenue
Bronx, NY 10452
 Tuesday, October 10, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 10* P.S. 306/ The Bronx School Of Young Leaders
40 West Tremont Avenue
Bronx, NY 10453
 Tuesday, October 3, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 11* Michelangelo Middle School (J.H.S. 144)
2545 Gunther Avenue
Bronx, NY 10469
 Tuesday, October 17, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 12*  Mott Hall V
1551 E 172nd Street
Bronx, NY 10472
 Tuesday, October 10, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 13  P.S. 133 William A. Butler
610 Baltic Street
Brooklyn, NY 11217
 Wednesday, October 25, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 14  P.S. 257 John F. Hylan
60 Cook Street
Brooklyn, NY 11206
 Thursday, October 19, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 15 P.S. 024
427 38th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11232
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5–7:30pm
 District 16* P.S. 308 Clara Cardwell
616 Quincy Street
Brooklyn, NY 11221
 Wednesday, October 18, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 17* Dr. Jacqueline PeekDavis School/ Ronald Edmonds Learning Center II
430 Howard Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11233
 Tuesday, October 3, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 18* P.S 66
845 East 96th Street
Brooklyn, NY 11236
 Wednesday, October 18, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 19* P.S. 013 Roberto Clemente
557 Pennsylvania Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11207
 Thursday, October 19, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 20 Franklin D. Roosevelt High School
5800 20th Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11204
 Wednesday, October 25, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 21 P.S. 215 Morris H. Weiss
415 Avenue S
Brooklyn, NY 11223
 Thursday, October 19, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 22 P.S. 222 Katherine R. Snyder
3301 Quentin Road
Brooklyn, NY 11234
 Wednesday, October 18, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 23* P.S. 156K Waverly School of the Arts
104 Sutter Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11212
 Tuesday, October 10, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 24 P.S. 110
43-18 97th Place
Queens, NY 11368
 Wednesday, October 25, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 25 I.S. 025 Adrien Block
34-65 192nd Street
Queens, NY 11358
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 26 P.S./I.S. 266
74-10 Commonwealth Boulevard
Queens, NY 11426
 Wednesday, October 11, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 27 P.S. 306 New York City Academy for Discovery
95-16 89th Avenue
Queens, NY 11421
 Wednesday, October 25, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 28  P.S. 182 Samantha Smith
153-27 88th Avenue
Queens, NY 11432
 Tuesday, October 17, 2017
6–7:30pm
 District 29*  Springfield Gardens Educational Campus
143-10 Springfield Boulevard
Queens, NY 11413
 Tuesday, October 10, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 30  P.S. 149 Christa Mcauliffe
93-11 34 Avenue
Queens, NY 11372
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5:30–7:30pm
 District 31*  New Dorp High School
465 New Dorp Lane
Staten Island, NY 10306
 Wednesday, October 11, 2017
5–7:30pm
 District 32  P.S. 376
194 Harman Street
Brooklyn, NY 11237
 Tuesday, October 24, 2017
5:30–7:30pm

Gifted and Talented programs are one way that New York City supports the educational needs of exceptional students. To participate in G&T admissions, sign your child up to take the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests. Students who get a high enough score on this test will have the chance to apply for G&T programs.



Teaching reading helps with NYC gifted and talented test prep
September 16, 2017, 9:48 am
Filed under: tests | Tags: , ,

As parents, we all want our children to be voracious readers.

Reading is the basis for so many academic skills, and reading often can increase your child’s vocabulary, attention span, and even his or her IQ! And of course any early reading you practice with your child will be of great assistance to those tough questions on the OLSAT test given for the NYC gifted and talented test. 

When their children are too young to read on their own, most parents read books to their children. Bedtime stories are an age-old tradition, and they are a great way to spark an early interest in — and love for — reading in your child.

I want to talk about an activity that can help your child gain even more from reading. Dialogic reading is a technique that makes reading more interactive: instead of just reading a book or chapter from beginning to end, you and your child have an ongoing conversation about the story as you read. The technique varies based on your child’s age and the type of book you’re reading; you should also keep track of what questions spark his interest and how well he’s responding to what you say.

After every page or two, you’ll want to use the PEER (Prompt, Evaluate, Expand, Repeat) sequence, which consists of the following:

  • Prompt your child to say something about the story: Ask an open-ended question about the plot, or ask why or when something happened. You can also ask your child to reword what happened, or to predict what will come next. You can even ask her to tie the story into something in her own life (for example, “Do you remember when we went for a hike in the woods, like the characters in the book did?”).
    • If you are reading picture books with a young child (2 to 3 years old), you can ask her what a certain picture is, or craft a what/where question (“What color is the car? Where is it going?”). You can also create a sentence and have your child fill in a blank (“Look at this car. Its tires are black and the hubcaps are ___________”).
  • Evaluate his response: If your child gets an answer right, give him positive reinforcement. If he’s wrong, don’t explicitly say so; rather, gently correct his answer (“It did seem like Mr. Smith went to the store on Tuesday, but actually it was Wednesday. They made that part tricky.”)
  • Expand on your child’s answer: This can be done either by adding more information to your child’s response and/or rephrasing what she said. (“Yes, the farmers did go to the market, and they also went for a hayride after that”).
  • Repeat your initial prompt: Here, work the expansion you just added into the prompt. So, for example, ask your child when the hayride occurred, or who went on it.

This technique isn’t just fun; it is a great way to put your child’s reading skills on the fast track. In a study, researchers found that children whose parents used dialogic reading for four weeks scored 6.5 to 8 months farther ahead than children who were read to in a standard fashion.

Part of making your child a better reader is helping her become a better listener! Watch the video below:



Back to school for PS 33 Chelsea Prep
September 7, 2017, 1:47 pm
Filed under: PS 33 chelsea prep | Tags:

Chelsea Prep PS 33 PTA Sends Welcome Message to Parents and Students

It’s that time of year again: the first day of school! The students and parents at PS 33 Chelsea Prep (One of the most popular district 2 NYC Gifted and Talented Programs) are ready to get back to G&T basics as we head into the fall season.  Here’s a welcome message sent out by the PTA at Chelsea Prep:

Welcome back!
Dear PS 33 Chelsea Prep families,

We are thrilled to welcome all new and returning families to PS 33. We hope your summer was filled with wonderful memories!

Please join us for our first PTA general meeting on September 18th in the auditorium at 8:45. You’ll be able to meet the Executive Board and learn all about PTA-supported programs that are available to PS 33 students. Please join us for a welcome breakfast following the meeting in the school’s garden.

Please consider volunteering at our school! Your ideas, time, and talents are truly needed. There are many areas where you can contribute and we will gladly match your time constraints and interests with needed tasks.

The PS33 PTA is looking forward to another exciting and productive school year!



Admissions into the gifted and talented program

The only requirement is acing the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests

It’s no secret that the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests used to screen kids for admission to NYC G&T program are hard. As more and more parents decide that they want their child to receive the best education possible, more are applying their children to these advanced programs – and so the tests are getting increasingly difficult and competitive. This past January over 2,000 more pre-K students took the G&T test for kindergarten admissions with very few additional seats added. This meant over 35% of the kids who qualified for a G&T seat didn’t get a spot because there weren’t enough seats available!

Ask your little one this sample OLSAT test question: Look at the space ship in the first box. Do you see the round windows on the red part of the space ship? If the space ship carried the same number of space babies to earth as thenumber of round windows you can count, point to the box that shows how many space babies the space ship carried to earth.

As a result, it’s no longer enough just to throw your child into the testing room and hope that they pass. Even the smartest kids – if they don’t prepare – are now being outgunned by kids who might not be as inherently bright, but whose parents spend months or even years planning, meticulously, for the testing and admissions process.

A mom from Queens tells her G&T story

Well, recently I spoke to a mother (from Queens) of a very bright boy who, for a long time, thought she knew better than those of us who have been through the testing process before. I had spoken to this mom, who we’ll call Debbie, before, and explained to her how crucial it is to at least familiarize her son Jordan with the material he would face on the test. Plus, I reminded her that most children her son’s age haven’t ever been in a testing situation before, so they need to be mentally prepared for the process of sitting for half an hour or more, locked in a room with a usually stone-faced test proctor who isn’t allowed to give any feedback – positive or negative.

Debbie listened politely, but I could tell she wasn’t hearing what I was saying: she had already made up her mind, and wouldn’t be doing any prep work with her son. You know the type – right?

“Jordan is so smart,” Debbie told me more than once. “He always gets A’s on his tests in school, so why should this test be any different?”

“Besides,” Debbie told me, “I’ve always felt that these tests are meant to measure kids’ intelligence, so preparing with them is essentially ‘cheating’: either the kid is smart or he isn’t.”

Debbie kept in touch with me as OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests day drew closer, letting me know how well Jordan was doing in school and how confident she was that he would ace the test. I wished her luck and held out hope that Jordan would pass the test and make it into their local gifted program – but I knew that the odds were against him, given Debbie’s steadfast refusal to do anything to prepare him for the exam.

Sure enough, Jordan went into the test unprepared. When the OLSAT test scores came in, Jordan had done well – surprisingly well, in fact: he’d earned a score in the 95th percentile, very impressive for a child who hadn’t done any kind of preparatory work. But it wasn’t quite good enough to get Jordan into the program his mother was sure he was destined for: just to be considered for a seat at a citywide program like NEST+m or Anderson, Jordan needed to score in the 99th percentile.

Debbie was devastated. She was sure that Jordan would skate into the program, and she was convinced that “unworthy” kids had taken his spot. Disappointment turned to bitterness, and Debbie soured on the idea of ever applying Jordan to another gifted program. Her exact words: “I’m done. I’ll never let my child take another one of these OLSAT tests again.”

I knew this was a mistake as well. I told Debbie over and over: Jordan had a good shot of passing the gifted test the following year – if she took my advice and prepared him for it this time. For months, Debbie refused to budge: Jordan would never take that test again.

I refused to take no for an answer, though, since I was as convinced as Debbie that Jordan had too much potential to be stuck in a general education program. I kept on Debbie: try again next year. If you do take concrete steps to get Jordan ready, he’ll do fine.

Thankfully, after months of despair and hand-wringing, Debbie came to her senses and decided to apply Jordan to the gifted program again. Within a week, she signed up for a Testing Mom for the OLSAT practice questions  and began working with Jordan. They started out slow, getting Jordan used to the format of the questions and the process of sitting still and focusing on the material. As time went on, Debbie extended the practice time and increased the difficulty of the questions they worked with. By the time test day rolled around again, Jordan was accustomed to sitting and focusing for nearly an hour and answering questions designed for kids at least two grade levels above his own.

Before long, scores came out again and this time the news was unequivocally good: Jordan scored in the 99th percentile, qualifying him for the citywide gifted program and guess what? He made it into NEST+M one of the most sought after G&T programs in NYC!