NYC Gifted and Talented Program and Testing


Secrets to acing the OLSAT test

So, when kids first see the different types of questions on the OLSAT test, they think they’re weird and they don’t understand them right away. As a parent, you want your child to experience their confusion in seeing these questions for the first time when they’re at home with you, and you can help them (contrary to what “they” tell you!). Not when they’re all alone at school under the pressure of taking an actual test without you there to support them. Especially, if you have a younger child ages 3 to 5 years old who has never (ever!) taken an actual test and has no idea of the different between a right and wrong answer.  No matter if you live in Brookly, Staten Island or Queens it’s imperative you prepare your child for the upcoming NYC gifted and talented test. The OLSAT test is no joke and shouldn’t be taken lightly.

Even if your child it taking the OLSAT test next year there’s really no time to waste. Whether your child’s test is in three days or three months, working with  practice questions and online prep games for the OLSAT can make all the difference. These are just a few examples of the types of questions that are on the gifted test. Naturally, the questions get harder as children go up in grade levels. If your pre-K to sixth grader is taking the OLSAT and you’d like to learn more about the types of questions on this test. You can try a few practice questions for the OLSAT test here!

 

OLSAT
Test Subset
Grade Pre-K and K
Level A
Verbal Questions
  • Verbal Comprehension
No
  • Following Directions
Yes
  • Antonyms
No
  • Sentence Completion
No
  • Sentence Arrangement
No
Verbal Reasoning Questions
  • Aural Reasoning
Yes
  • Arithmetic Reasoning
Yes
  • Logical Selection
No
  • Word/Letter Matrix
No
  • Verbal Analogies
No
  • Verbal Classification
No
  • Inference
No
Nonverbal
  • Pictorial Reasoning
No
  • Picture Classification
Yes
  • Picture Analogies
Yes
  • Picture Series
Yes
Figural Reasoning
  • Figural Classification
Yes
  • Figural Analogies
Yes
  • Pattern Matrix
Yes
  • Figural Series
Yes
Quantitative Reasoning
  • Number Series
No
  • Numeric Inference
No
  • Number Matrix


Not enough gifted and talented seats in the Bronx
May 12, 2017, 2:20 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program, OLSAT Test | Tags:

The lawmakers passed a bill for parents to be better informed of the NYC Gifted and Talented Program for the Bronx, specially in district 10.  As more and more kids take the test citywide (including the Bronx) that means more and more kids are receiving a qualifying score to entry into this competitive program across all five boroughs in the city. The Bronx and Staten Island are the only two boroughs that currently do not have a citywide program and have a short supply of district wide programs for both.  This new plan from lawmakers requires that all parents of pre-K students receive multiple notifications of the NYC Gifted and Talented Program .  Many parents complain (rightfully so) of how hard it is to get information from the DOE web site that honestly needs a complete overhaul and better usability.

Many advocates of better communication are pushing that all pre-K students take the G&T test and the parents will need to opt-out of taking the test. This of course would dramatically increase the raw number of kids taking this test, especially in lower income areas of the Bronx. The hopes would be more qualifying students since most parents would not opt-out of their child taking the test. We’ll see if this proposal moves forward since this would not only impact the Bronx but all other boroughs for children in the universal pre-K program in NYC. The implications of have even more kids taking the test leads to the larger issue of where are all the kids going to get a seat in the G&T program that’s already in short supply.

 

Right now, there are only two district wide programs in district 10:



Tons of questions from parents about NYC gifted and talented

Testing Mom Facebook Live the other night received tons of questions from parents about NYC gifted and talented test results that were recently released.

The folks over at TestingMom.com hosted a very informative Facebook Live the other night for frantic NYC parents who just received the test results for their talented tots. These parents all seemed to be the lucky ones whose children made a score high enough on the NNAT-2 test and OLSAT test to qualify for a coveted seat into one of these elite kindergartens in New York City for the 2017-2018 school year. It seemed that all the parents on the Facebook Live feed were happy since they were asking about what schools were the best and bragging about their gifted girls and brilliant boys throughout the hour+ session on Facebook. Here are a few of the many questions that the New York City parents were spouting throughout the session:

  • I called the kinder doe hotline and was told that admissions to district gifted and talented is based on lottery. The G&T handbooks however states that they go by the score. So confused.
  • Given your experience what are your thoughts on PS 33 Chelsea Prep G&T? Seemed like a very large school. Do you feel it is luck of the draw based on your assigned teacher?
  • Our son scored 97th percentile, our one in district school with a gifted and talented class isn’t so great. being in the 97th percentile, how good are his chances at a better district school with a G&T class?
  • Do you know anything about District 22 G&T schools in Brooklyn? Our son’s overall score was 92 and his current school has a G&T program but I was told by a parent that he needed to score in the 99th percentile to get in.
  • We are in District 14, and there is only one G&T Program, once you are under 97%, how do they decide placement in district-wide, is it a lottery and is it worth exploring districts outside your own? Any thoughts on PS 132?
  • My older one is in citywide G&T school at TAG. The younger one is District G&T program already. Last 2 years she got 96. Is there any chance to get in TAG as sibling preferences. By the way, the younger one will be in 3rd grade next year.


Non-profit HOPEorgNYC helps prepare kids for gifted and talented test

The non-profit HOPEorgNYC helps prepare kids for the gifted and talented test in New York City.  Jill Goldstein, founder of @HOPEorgNYC, founded the non-profit in 2015 due to the lack of participation of students in lower-income areas of NYC who take the NYC gifted and talented test for children entering kindergarten through 3rd grade. The mission of this group is to lessen the divide within the gifted and talented program in New York City.  HOPE meets with students every Saturday morning from September through January to help them prepare for the upcoming NNAT and OLSAT tests.

Over the years, it has been evident that the NYC gifted and talented program skews to more Caucasian and Asian students vs. African American and Latino students. The population of gifted and talented students based upon race is disproportionate to the racial population of the city. According to the NY Times, this racial segregation within the schools begins as early as pre-K and then really manifests itself going into kindergarten with the gifted and talented program.

HOPE plans to even out the playing field within district 10 in the Bronx where the program meets at the local library every Saturday to help local students prepare for the test. Their goal is two fold: help the kids succeed on the the G&T test and to do well in school.

Here are students who have benefited from the wonderful work HOPE is doing in the Bronx. The kids thank TestingMom.com for giving them test prep materials and for sponsoring the HOPE team.

 



New York City not the only ones taking OLSAT test
March 31, 2016, 3:29 pm
Filed under: OLSAT Test, OLSAT test prep

Well, it looks like the kids in New York City aren’t the only ones taking the OLSAT test for admissions into gifted programs. Out in California, there’s a program in Davis called AIM which also uses the OLSAT test for admissions into their gifted program. According to the article, it looks like 10% of the third grade students (56 out of 543) who took the OLSAT test scored high enough to be in the Davis School District’s AIM program.

As with the NYC Gifted and Talented test, the scores seem to be skewed in favor of children of Caucasian and Asian descent with very few Latino and African-Americans being represented as those who qualified. The Davis school board is now questioning if the OLSAT test is the right type of test to qualify kids for this particular gifted program in Davis. This has also been the ongoing debate in NYC where the NNAT-2 non-verbal test was introduced a few years ago but the outcomes of the the distribution of qualified students by ethnicity have remained virtually unchanged (mostly white and Asian and very few Latino and African American students).



Good news about pre-K and gifted and talented
February 23, 2016, 5:04 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program, OLSAT Test | Tags: ,

Well, it looks like one of the unforeseen consequences of the NYC universal pre-K program is that it causes more talented tots to qualify for a seat in the ultra competitive NYC gifted and talented program. According to a study in Educational Researcher 4-year-olds who attend a preschool are 4.8 times more likely to get a qualified score for the competitive NYC G&T program. The findings shouldn’t be very surprising since early education initiatives would have a direct impact on not only overall performance but also how the child takes direction from a teacher. Since the OLSAT test requires listening from the child, any child who is in pre-K would have an advantage by more likely having to develop listening skills since they are in a classroom setting. Hopefully by all children attending universal pre-K in lower income areas these children will now be able to perform better on the G&T test. Plus parents in these areas will be more likely to know about the NYC gifted and talented program since the pre-K teachers will hopefully tell parents about the program.

Here’s the full article>



NYC Gifted and Talented Testing Canceled this weekend

Due to Super Snow Storm Jonas the NYC Gifted and Talented Testing has been cancelled this weekend. I suppose it’s a good thing for parents who haven’t done any preparation and allows them more time to start practicing with their little ones with questions from TestingMom.com. Tons of practice questions for both the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests.

Here’s what the DOE said on their web site regarding the test being canceled this weekend:

G&T News

The Office of Student Enrollment welcomes you to Gifted & Talented Admissions!

Testing is cancelled for January 23 and 24, 2016 due to the weather. If you were scheduled to test on January 23 or 24, you will be contacted this coming week about rescheduling your test. Please email questions about your student’s test to the email address listed on your appointment letter. You can email servicecenter@schools.nyc.gov with general questions about G&T testing.