NYC Gifted and Talented Program and Testing


Start preparing for the NYC gifted and talented test

Well, it’s time to start preparing for the NYC gifted and talented test even though school starts in September. So far, there have been no changes announced by the Dept. of Ed to the testing process and procedures for this upcoming testing season in January-February 2016.   Here are some quick and dirty stats as of the time of this writing:

  • 70,000 seats in standard-track gen-ed kindergarten classrooms; 2,700 seats in G&T programs* (appx. 250 seats are available for Citywide programs – this is for non-siblings).
  • Admission based solely on the test score (for NNAT-2 test and OLSAT test). The NNAT test has 48 questions and the OLSAT has 30 non-verbal questions. Each test accounts for 50% of the child’s overall score. The two tests are administered at the same time with the NNAT non-verbal first then the OLSAT verbal section.
  • In Jan.-Feb. 2015 almost 38,000 students from pre-K to 2nd grade took the NYC gifted and talented test.
  • Pre-K students do not need to fill in bubble sheet – only point to the correct answer.
  • Kindergarten to 2nd grade take test at school if in public school. No testing in 3rd to 5th grade.
  • Once in gifted program, no re-testing necessary each year through 5th grade. Middle school is entirely different story.
  • If your pre-K child is testing for the G&T continue with your registration for general ed. kindergarten at your local public school. Do the two processes concurrently.
  • Important note: G&T curriculum varies from program to program – even at the district level. There is no standard G&T curriculum in NYC so make sure you check with other parents who have kids in the program to get as much information as you can about their curriculum and how it varies (if at all) compared to the general ed classrooms. Some vary,  some don’t so do your homework!

If you’re looking for more in-depth guide on the New York City Gifted and Talented Program there’s a well written guide from the folks at Testing Mom for only five dollars. The best deal around.

NYC Survival Guide cover



NYC Gifted and Talented Admissions for 4th and 5th grades

The Dept. of Ed. just announced the new criteria for NYC Gifted and Talented admissions for 4th and 5th grades for the 2015-16 school year. Don’t worry, there’s no OLSAT test or NNAT-2 test involved but make sure your child is adored by his or her teacher, that’s for sure! According to the DOE here’s the “new and improved” criteria they will be using if you want your child to enter a G&T program going into 4th or 5th grades.

  • 2015 New York State English Language Arts (ELA) and Math scores
  • 2015 Report Card Grades
  • Descriptors of Exceptional Characteristics provided by the student’s teacher

The deadline to apply is on May 22, 2015 and here are the locations for all 5 boroughs to submit your application. Guess what? You get to leave work early since you can’t do this online or by mail. Did I just have a flashback to 1972? All requests must be made in person and the Family Welcome Center facilities are only open 8am to 3pm. So much for being so welcoming and for those parents who don’t have any flexibility at their jobs to cut-out early. Just tell your boss that you want your child to have a better life (and job!) than you and you must leave early! I’m sure the “boss man” will completely understand…yeah, right.

The Dept. of Ed. does provide specific guidance for the criteria but it does allow some opinions and biases being inserted by the teacher to determine if the child is worthy of getting a coveted seat into the NYC G&T program or not. Here are a few hypothetical situations that could occur to the detriment of the child:

  • The teacher and parent(s) don’t get along and the only recourse the teacher has to get back at the parents is to not give a child a recommendation. What if the parents are hardcore Republicans who support Ted Cruz for president and don’t believe in teacher unions. Oh yeah, those parents would be homeschooling anyway.
  • The teacher and principal collude because the child scores 4’s on both the ELA and math test and they want to keep their school test scores high, therefore don’t recommend the child attend a G&T program. Remember, schools in NYC are ranked on how children perform on the not-so-popular common core ELA and math tests.
  • The teacher and parents are good friends outside school and the parents use that friendship to manipulate the teacher in writing exaggerated claims about their child’s abilities. Highly unlikely, I know…but these are hypothetical situations! :-)

Of course, the list of hypothetical situations could go on and on. So fun to think about all the possibilities and the lengths some parents in New York City would go to for their talented tot to get into the gifted and talented program.

I do find it interesting the DOE announced the criteria included state test scores were being used a week after the state tests were completed. I’m sure if parents knew up front that this was part of the criteria process parents across all five boroughs would be heading over in droves to Testing Mom to get free practice questions for the New York ELA and math tests.



NYC gifted and talented test scores
The NYC gifted and talented test scores have been released for kids going into kindergarten this fall (2015). So many parents are estactic that their talented tot made the cut and now hopes are even higher to get a coveted spot at one of the citywide or district wide gifted programs sprinkled throughout the city. There’s always a sour apple in the bunch and here’s an email that Testing Mom online test prep received from a parent who is really upset about her son’s score (even at the 95th percentile). Here’s what she told Testing Mom:

Hi Testing Mom,

My 4-year-old son stands no chance of getting accepted into one the gifted and talented citywide kindergarten programs since he scored in the 95th percentile. I thought he’d score in the 99th (I’ve been told by numerous people how smart he is), but I suppose he just isn’t as smart as everyone thought. I’m very disappointed in him because he said the test was easy after he came out of the testing room…although I now blame myself and feel like a horrible mother because I didn’t sign-up for your program until after I received his scores so we can start practicing for next year’s test. I heard about you from several parents last fall and their kids made 98th and 99th percentiles but I thought I could do it on my own without any outside help…boy, was I wrong. He did so well on the 10 questions provided in the handbook from the Dept. of Ed. but they probably only put easy questions in their handbook so parents don’t feel they need to prepare. Even after using your program for just the past couple of days since I received his scores I have discovered the areas he needs to focus on. If I only knew then what I know now things might have turned out very different.

My stomach turns every time I look at his score on the test and I’m trying not to hold a grudge against him – after all, he is only 4-years-old. I know some parents would be so happy with a 95th percentile, but now I wish he would have bombed the whole test instead of being on the cusp.

M.L. – mom in Flushing Queens – NYC

Wow, this mom is what I’d call hardcore but I suppose it’s a typical response from some parents in New York City when the harsh reality sinks in. I hope this mom doesn’t give up on her son and it sounds like she’s wanting him to take the test again. I’m sure he’ll do better next year and hopefully score in the 99th percentile so his mother once again will be proud to have him as her offspring.



Testing for the NYC gifted and talented program

Well, tens of thousands of tots begin the annual pilgrimage to get tested for the New York City gifted and talented program. The testing takes place on the weekends for the pre-K students at a local public school and for those kids in kindergarten to second grade take the test at their school during the day. Nervous parents across the city are vying for coveted spots in the most competitive kindergarten race in the world. Last year, over 1,900 kids qualified for the city-wide gifted and talented program for kindergarten at schools like NEST+M and Anderson for only 250 available seats between all five city-wide gifted and talented programs. It’s just like the lottery, if you don’t play you can’t win so make sure your child takes the test because your child may be one of the lucky ones to get one of the 250 available seats in the ultra competitive city-wide program. Luckily, there’s always the district wide G&T programs so that opens up more available seats to parents who kids score in the 90 to 99th percentile on the NNAT2 and OLSAT tests. So much for the simple life in New York City for these parents and their little ones who have no idea of the massive consequences if they do not score well on these tests.



New York City Dept. of Ed has released gifted and talented handbooks
October 2, 2014, 12:37 pm
Filed under: naglieri test, nnat test, OLSAT Test, OLSAT test prep | Tags:

New York City Dept. of Ed has released gifted and talented handbooks the upcoming testing seasons that starts in January, 2015! The DOE is hosting information sessions in all 5 boroughs (dates and locations below). Registration for the NYC G&T test opens online next Wed., Oct. 8th so there’s nothing to do until then (except of course start practicing with your child!). After a quick review of the handbooks it doesn’t look like there are any major changes to the admissions process from last year. The OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests are still given to our talented tots to qualify for a seat in the gifted and talented program in New York City.

Go here to find out the the nitty-gritty details in the Gifted and Talented Handbook.

Here are the details on the info. sessions hosted by the NYC Dept. of Ed. Please note these information regurgitate the same information that’s contained in the handbook.

Manhattan
High School of Fashion Industries
225 West 24th Street, Tuesday, October 14   6:00 – 8:00 PM

Brooklyn
Clara Barton High School
901 Classon Avenue, Wednesday, October 15   6:00 – 8:00 PM
Staten Island
P.S. 69 Daniel D. Tompkins
144 Keating Place, Thursday, October 16    6:00 – 8:00 PM

Bronx
Theodore Roosevelt Educational Campus
500 East Fordham Road, Tuesday, October 21    6:00 – 8:00 PM

Queens
Forest Hills High School
67-01 110th Street,  Wednesday, October 22    6:00 – 8:00 PM

The folks at Testing Mom (the site where you can get free OLSAT and NNAT practice questions) are hosting seminars in late October for parents in NYC! These seminars will tell you information that the DOE won’t or can’t!



New York Common Core Test Results Released

Well, it’s not gifted and talented but it might as well be! The New York state common core test results were released last week! And guess what? Only one-third of the students in the entire state passed the test and a little less for the city of New York.  This is slightly above last year but still a very low percentage of the students passing.

Here’s a quote from Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl H. Tisch (for the state of New York)

“Statewide, the percentage of students scoring at the proficient level and above in math rose from 31.2 to 35.8 across all grades combined.”

State Education Commissioner John B. King, Jr. said:

“The percentage of students scoring at the partial proficiency level and above also rose in math, from 66.9 to 69.6 percent.”

In English Language Arts (ELA), the percentage of New York students scoring at the proficient level rose one-tenth of a percent, from 31.3 to 31.4 percent, across all grades combined (3rd through 8th grade).

So, what does this have to do with the OLSAT test and the NNAT-2 test for the New York City Gifted and Talented Program. I suppose nothing directly but it is interesting to see how the dreaded “common core” has become a thorn in the side of so many schools, teachers and principals. On the flip side, some of the G&T programs in NYC scored extremely well on the common core test. Here are the test scores for Anderson, Lower Lab and NEST. All three of these programs have an entire student population gifted and talented. It seems the staff, principals and teachers at these three schools were conspicuously silent when it came to the protest from teachers and principals earlier this school year when it came to the common core. Maybe because their students did so incredibly well on these very difficult tests?  Maybe the lower performing schools within NYC should take note and realize that having practically every student pass the common core test is possible.

Click on images below to enlarge. Please note, 4 is the highest score and any score of 3 or 4 is considered passing. 1 or 2 is below average or failing.

Looking for common core practice questions or OLSAT and NNAT questions? Go to Testing Mom and get some now (for free)

nest gifted test scores

 

 

anderson school test scores

lower lab test scores

 



Summer is almost over and AABL testing begins

Summer is almost over and AABL testing begins. So long WWPSI and hello AABL! The new test given to preschoolers vying for a spot in the most competitive private school kindergartens in New York City.  This new test, called the AABL, is just another one to add to the array of tests given to 4-year-olds in the most competitive city the world. Depending on where you live and what schools you are interested in your child attending your child can take up to 4 tests! I suppose that’s one test for every year they have been alive. Here’s the breakdown:

  1. OLSAT test – given to preschoolers for entry in the NYC gifted and talented program from the New York City Department of ed. A child get retake the test every year up through 2nd grade if they don’t qualify.
  2. NNAT-2 test – this is also given to preschoolers for entry in the NYC gifted and talented program from the New York City Department of ed.
  3. Stanford-Binet test – this is given to kids who are applying to Hunter College Elementary School gifted program
  4. AABL – the test formerly called the ERB (aka WPPSI) given to kids applying to kindergarten private schools in NYC.

I know, it’s enough to make your head spin but I suppose it’s just part of the vetting process where every parent must decide what’s best for their child and their particular situation.

You can get lots of free sample questions for the AABL test at TestingMom.com




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