NYC Gifted and Talented Program and Testing


Hunter College Elementary School Gifted and Talented Program

Hunter College Elementary School Gifted and Talented Program

Here’s an overview of the ultra competitive Hunter College Elementary School program located on the Upper East Side. Children applying to kindergarten take a modified version of the Stanford-Binet® V test from September through November (the year before they start kindergarten).  Over the past few years the qualifying score for 2nd round at Hunter ranged from 143 through 149 s – students who qualify go on to round 2, where more testing will be done.  Percentile rankings will show a child’s standing in comparison to students his own age, not grade level.

 

Criteria for admissions for Hunter College Elementary
  • Manhattan residents only! 25 boys and 25 girls for admitted for K
  • Once you apply, you get a Hunter ID # and 3 weeks to schedule and complete testing – $350 for test; $70 application fee,
  • You’ll get a choice of 5 testers and you can only contact 1 for an appointment.

 

Most people have heard about IQ scores — 146 to 159 is “highly gifted,” 131 to 145 is considered “moderately gifted,” 116 to 130 is “high average,” and 85 – 115 is considered “average.” For many children, the difference between being labeled highly gifted or gifted can come down to a single point, and that one point may impact their ability to get into fantastic Gifted and Talented programs that will provide tremendous educational benefits.  For example, last year, children needed to score at least 148 to be invited to the second round of testing for admission to Hunter College Elementary, one of the top gifted programs in the country that is located in New York City. .

Because an IQ test is so different from a skills or achievement test, it is harder to study for. Additionally, since it is given to children so young, there is a chance that a child might get scared or nervous, and make mistakes that could cost him many points. Most children taking the Stanford-Binet test at age-4 have never taken a test before in their lives.  They may not know how to sit still for a long period of time, listen carefully to what is being asked of them, how to think through a question and look at all the answer choices before jumping in and responding.  This is a brand new skill set for little (and even many older!) children.  Developing these test-taking abilities is as challenging to young children as knowing the answers to the questions they are being asked.

The Stanford-Binet® test is a particularly hard test because it includes so many different subtests.  While many tests group the same types of questions together, which allows children to become more comfortable with the material, a psychologist administering the Stanford-Binet test will skip around and mix different types of questions together.  This can be confusing for some children.  For these reasons, we believe it is critical that (at the minimum) you give your child exposure to the types of questions that he or she will encounter on the test.



Tons of questions from parents about NYC gifted and talented

Testing Mom Facebook Live the other night received tons of questions from parents about NYC gifted and talented test results that were recently released.

The folks over at TestingMom.com hosted a very informative Facebook Live the other night for frantic NYC parents who just received the test results for their talented tots. These parents all seemed to be the lucky ones whose children made a score high enough on the NNAT-2 test and OLSAT test to qualify for a coveted seat into one of these elite kindergartens in New York City for the 2017-2018 school year. It seemed that all the parents on the Facebook Live feed were happy since they were asking about what schools were the best and bragging about their gifted girls and brilliant boys throughout the hour+ session on Facebook. Here are a few of the many questions that the New York City parents were spouting throughout the session:

  • I called the kinder doe hotline and was told that admissions to district gifted and talented is based on lottery. The G&T handbooks however states that they go by the score. So confused.
  • Given your experience what are your thoughts on PS 33 Chelsea Prep G&T? Seemed like a very large school. Do you feel it is luck of the draw based on your assigned teacher?
  • Our son scored 97th percentile, our one in district school with a gifted and talented class isn’t so great. being in the 97th percentile, how good are his chances at a better district school with a G&T class?
  • Do you know anything about District 22 G&T schools in Brooklyn? Our son’s overall score was 92 and his current school has a G&T program but I was told by a parent that he needed to score in the 99th percentile to get in.
  • We are in District 14, and there is only one G&T Program, once you are under 97%, how do they decide placement in district-wide, is it a lottery and is it worth exploring districts outside your own? Any thoughts on PS 132?
  • My older one is in citywide G&T school at TAG. The younger one is District G&T program already. Last 2 years she got 96. Is there any chance to get in TAG as sibling preferences. By the way, the younger one will be in 3rd grade next year.


NYC Gifted and Talented Testing Overview

NYC Gifted and Talented Testing

Here’s a good overview of the NYC gifted and talented program as of early 2017. If you are reading this, then you are a parent or a grandparent in NYC who is trying to find the best possible school for your little one.  There are so many options in New York – private schools, gifted and talented programs, general education – it can sometimes feel overwhelming, especially if your child is just 4-years-old!

1)      Citywide Gifted and Talented Programs – Children will take the Verbal Portion only of the Otis Lennon School Ability Test® (OLSAT® test), which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score (Following Directions, Aural Reasoning, Arithmetic Reasoning for Levels A, B, C or K – 2nd grade), and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test® (NNAT®2 test), a non-verbal test, which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score. The question to your right is a practice question for the Pattern Completion subtest for the NNAT2 test.

 

OLSAT Levels Grade
 Level A  Pre-K to Kindergarten
 Level B  First Grade
 Level C  Second Grade

Your child will be given a nationally normed percentile rank for the OLSAT test and a percentile rank for the NNAT2 test.  Then, these two scores will be combined into a single percentile score that will be normed against other NYC students.   A child must score at the 97th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.  In the last few years (due to space limitations), only children who score in the 99th percentile have gotten into these programs.  The only exception to this is siblings of current students who are admitted with 97th percentile or above.

2)      District Gifted and Talented Programs – Children will take the Verbal Portion only of the Otis Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT test), which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score (Following Directions, Aural Reasoning, Arithmetic Reasoning for Levels A, B, C or K – 2nd grade), and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test® (NNAT®2 test), a non-verbal test, which counts for 50% of the child’s composite score – a child must score at the 90th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.

Your child will be given a nationally normed percentile rank for the OLSAT test and a percentile rank score for the NNAT2 test.  Then, these two scores will be combined into a single percentile score that will be normed against other NYC students.   A child must score at the 90th percentile or above to be eligible for these programs.

For the Otis Lennon School Ability Test® (OLSAT® test), there are 3 types of questions:

 

 Types of Questions Description of type of OLSAT verbal questions
Arithmetic Reasoning The child must listen carefully to math word problems that use basic mathematical concepts such as same, different, fewer, more, etc., along with simple addition, subtraction, fractions (half, quarter), etc.
Following Directions Here the child must listen carefully to verbal questions describing similarities and differences, positional and rank comparisons (above, below, between, next to, bigger, smaller, etc.), or descriptions and choose visual images that fit the description.
 Aural Reasoning Again, the child must listen carefully to verbal descriptions of scenarios, similarities and differences, prepositions, and situations that use vocabulary or ideas that make the child think in order to choose the visual image that fits the description.

 



More reviews of Testing Mom
March 28, 2017, 3:35 pm
Filed under: testing mom, testingmom.com | Tags: ,

I’ve been doing more reviews of Testing Mom and wanted to outline their incredible membership offering they have for any parent no matter what your budget. The enormous offering is by far what you can get anywhere else online.

Here are all of the goodies you get with your Testing Mom Fast Track membership. This membership is geared for the busy, do-it-yourself parent of a pre-K student through 8th grade student. All of their online resources include stress-free test prep and online skill building resources.

  • Over 100,000 practice questions, online games and printables for the most popular tests from Pre-K to 8th Grade.
    • CogAT®, OLSAT® test, NNAT®-2 test and 3, ITBS, NYC Gifted, Houston, Chicago, state assessments, common core and dozens more!
  • Skill Building Academy for Pre-K to 8th Grade
    • Full access to 40 top educational resources! Your kids can learn math, reading, ELA, science, social studies, chess, keyboarding and much more! Over a $1,000 value included FREE with your Fast Track Membership. Keep the momentum high and instill a love of learning.
  • Kindergarten readiness, parent resources and more
    • No matter whether you’re preparing your toddler for kindergarten or a 5th grader for middle school, they have the resources and tools for school and testing success.
  • The best part of Testing Mom is one membership covers your entire household! You don’t get punished if you have more than one child.

You can start today with 100 free questions at Testing Mom.



NYC asked to release more data on schools
March 2, 2017, 6:50 pm
Filed under: NYC Gifted and Talented Program | Tags:

According to the NY Times, councilman Bill Kallos, is proposing a new bill for the city to do deep dive into reporting of student information for public record. The NYC Dept of Ed. already posts on school capacity and whether a public school has too few or too many students. The councilman is proposing that residency information is also included. The impact of this is to not only tell what local kids are attending schools but also where NYC G&T students are coming from within their district or in the case of city wide programs where these students are commuting from. Many local residents complain that their child didn’t get a G&T seat because it was given to students who don’t even live near the school.  Mr. Kallos hopes that this new bill will increase more diversity within the NYC school systems since many neighborhoods are segregated by socio-economic class and by race.

Pretty much all of the citywide and district wide G&T programs are jammed pack since parents are vying for so few spots with so many children making the qualifying score. Many of these same parents have decent gen ed programs in their neighborhood although they are seeking an even better education for their talented tot. That’s why so many parents in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan their young child for the NYC Gifted and Talented test and anxiously await the test results that arrive each April. Here’s some good info on the NYC Gifted and Talented Test along with tons of practice questions.



Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island NYC Gifted and Talented Test Prep

Manhattan has been the mecca of the NYC Gifted and Talented test prep

Although, there is a high-demand for practice questions in Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island Gifted and Talented Test Prep. And the Bronx is also seeing a slight increase in parents preparing their talented tots. Although Staten Island has 6 district wide programs for the G&T program there currently is no citywide program there and in the Bronx. Many parents use private tutors to help their child succeed on the OLSAT and NNAT-2 tests while some use workbooks. The good news is there’s an online tool from Testing Mom that has tons of free practice questions for the NYC gifted and talented.

If you live in Queens, parents there are fighting the DOE to keep the policy of automatic admissions for middle school if the child is in the G&T program in elementary school. Here’s a quote from a mom who has a child attending the gifted and talented program in Queens:

Even in kindergarten, the homework workload is just over the top,” she said. “The kids who are there by fifth grade belong in the G&T program,” she added. “These kids work so hard.”

I suppose she’s inferring that other kids in non-G&T classroom don’t work hard and don’t deserve automatic placement like her darling child? Hmmmm. In my opinion, students applying to middle school should all be on the same playing field. If they are looking at state scores, report cards and teacher reports then shouldn’t G&T students already have an advantage? Seems that way to me.

Here’s the list of the gifted and talented citywide programs and any student who receives a qualifying score in any of the boroughs can apply to one of these very popular programs.

Borough District Location School Name
Manhattan 1 Lower East Side New Explorations into Science, Technology and Math – NEST + M
Manhattan 3 Upper West Side The Anderson School
Manhattan 4 Far Upper East Side TAG Young Scholars 
Brooklyn 20 Bensonhurst Brooklyn School Of Inquiry
Queens 30 Flushing The 30th Avenue School


More parents give their Testing Mom reviews

More and more parents give their Testing Mom reviews on the internet!

Most are very positive and seems to have a personal beef with the Testing Mom. Not sure what’s going on with that relationship although it struck me as quite odd. Here’s an excerpt of their review of the Testing Mom program:

I think of testingmom as the first semester of test prep.   A few months before the test, we switched to ridiculously hard oddball brain teasers that I found in a variety of places.   I expected about 50% correct.  If you are subscribing to testingmom a month before the test, cover the intro material and skip right to the really hard questions related to the test you are going to take.  You will find these on the site, just not 20,000 of them.

Here are a couple more excerpts from reviews of Testing Mom online test prep program that are pretty positive.

This one is from mommy blogger: The Educators Spin On It

My youngest just started Kindergarten this year. I started teaching Kindergarten in 1997 and in almost 20 years quite a bit has changed when it comes to Kindergarten testing and even in Kindergarten Curriculum. I know this causes quite a bit of anxiety in parents. In this video, Karen Quinn, cofounder of TestingMom.com, addresses the difference between tests given for kindergarten admissions and kindergarten readiness. Karen discusses the similarities and differences among IQ tests, achievement tests, and readiness tests. If your child is getting ready to enter kindergarten, a gifted and talented program, or a private school, this video is a must-watch.

This one is from mommy blogger: Love, Peace and Tiny Feet

TestingMom.com is a fully accredited online education and test prep program for students Pre-K to 8th Grade. Their online educational program was designed by parents (with the support of education professionals) to help other parents and their kids aged Pre-K through 8th grade develop a lifelong love of learning.Through the site, you get immediate access to award-winning learning programs from the top names in education to help enrich your child’s abilities overall or in any subject area they are struggling with. These include Printables, practice tests and interactive games – just whatever you find your child responds best to.